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Senate | May 24, 2016 | Chamber | Senate Convenes

Full MP3 Audio File

[BLANK_AUDIO] The Senate will come to order. The Sergeant-at-Arms close the doors, and members will go to their seats. Members and guests in the gallery, please silence your electronic devices. Leading the Senate in prayer is The Reverend Peter Milner, Senate Chaplain. All members and guests in the gallery will please stand. [BLANK_AUDIO] >> Let's bow our heads and pray. Almighty and gracious Lord, we thank you for this day. We praise you for this General Assembly, for this State, for these leaders here to my left and to my right. These elected representatives of the people of this great State of North Carolina. We come before you, and we ask you to pour out your blessing on them. Keep us always under the shadow of your wing. It's in Jesus name we pray. Amen [BLANK_AUDIO] >> Senator Berger is recognized for a motion. >> Thank you, Mr. President. The Journal of Monday May 23rd, 2015, has been examined and it's found to be correct. I move, that we dispense with the reading of the Journal, and that it stand approved as written. >> Without objection, the Journal for May 23rd stands approved as written. Senators, we have leaves of absence today granted for Senator Smith and Blue. And we also have a Nurse of the Day with us. Kara Johnson of Leasburg, North Carolina is here. Nurse Johnson, please stand and be recognized. We appreciate your service to the Senate. >> [APPLAUSE] [BLANK_AUDIO] >> Senators, upon the motion of Senator Rick Gunn of Alamance and Randolph counties, the Chair is happy to extend courtesies of the gallery to constituents Julian and Deanna Lantine, and their Lantine family, visiting North Carolina all the way from Puerto Rico today. So if you're with us, please stand to be recognized, and welcome to the Senate. >> [APPLAUSE] [BLANK_AUDIO] >> Do we have any reports of standing committees? Senator Sanderson, for what purpose do you rise? >> To send forth committee reports, Mr. President. >> You can forward your report, Senator. The Clerk will read. [BLANK_AUDIO] >> Senator Sanderson, for the State and Local Government Committee submits for passage Senate Bill 748, Change Report, Building and Infrastructure Commission, favorable. Senate Bill 787, Stokes County/Local Acts - By request, favorable. Senate Bill 874, Sanford/Harnett OT, favorable. Senate Bill 875, Town of Sunset Beach/Deannexation, favorable. [BLANK_AUDIO] Senator Sanderson, State and Local Government Committee report submits for passage, Senate Bill 831, unfavorable as to bill, but favorable as to Committee Substitute bill. Titled, an act to allow the Duplin and Sampson County Sheriff's Offices to contract for the purchase of food and food services supplies for their county's detention facility without being subject to the requirement of certain State purchase and contract laws. And authorizing Duplin and Sampson counties and the municipalities in those counties, to transfer retired service animals owned by the local government. Senate Bill 852, unfavorable as to bill, but favorable as to Committee Substitute bill. Titled, an act removing certain described properties from the corporate limits of the town of Bakersville. >> Senate Bill 748, 787, 831, 852, calendar. Senate Bill 874 and 875, Finance. Senator Rucho, for what purpose do you rise? >> Thank you, Mr. President.

To send forth a conference report on Senate Bill 726. >> You can send forward your report, Senator. [BLANK_AUDIO] The Clerk will read. >> North Carolina General Assembly Council Report, Senate Bill 726. To the President of the Senate, the Speaker of the House. The conferees appointed to resolve the differences between the Senate and the House of Representatives on Senate Bill 726. A bill to be entitled an act to update the reference to the Internal Revenue Code, and to decouple from certain provisions of the Federal Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015, Second Edition engrossed 4/28/16, submit the following report. The House recedes from Amendment number 2, adopted on May 4, 2016, and the Senate and the House agree to the Second Edition engrossed 4/28/16. The conferees recommend that the Senate and the House of Representatives adopt this report. Date of report, approved May, 2016. Senator Bob Rucho, Chair. William Brawley, Chair. >> Senate Bill 726, calendar. Senator Rabon, for what purpose do you rise? >> Thank you, Mr. President. Send forth a committee report. >> Senator, you can send forward your committee report. [BLANK_AUDIO] The Clerk will read. >> Senator Rabon and Brown/g submits from Finance Committee, submits for passage House Bill 1023, Municipal Service District/Statutory Changes, favorable. Senate Bill 739, Town of Roseville/Annexation, favorable. Senate Bill 575, Committee Substitute number 1, unfavorable as to Committee Substitute bill number 1, but favorable as to Committee Substitute bill number 2. Title, an act to make legislative changes to facilitate the work of the boundary commission in confirming and reestablishing the original boundary existing between the States of North Carolina and South Carolina. >> House Bill 1023, calendar. Senate Bill 739 and 575, calendar. Senator Tillman, for what purpose do you rise? >> Thank you, Mr.President. Send forth the committee report. >> You can send forward your report, Senator. [BLANK_AUDIO] The Clerk will read. >> Senator Tillman for Education, Higher Education Committee submits for passage Senate Bill 867. Unfavorable as to bill, but favorable as to Committee Substitute bill titled, an act to require criminal background checks for teacher licensure, and school personnel employment. >> Senate Bill 867, JI. [BLANK_AUDIO] Any other reports for standing committees? That will take us right into our calendar for the day. [BLANK_AUDIO] Starting with Public Bills, second reading. Senate Bill 818, the Clerk will read. >> Senate Bill 818, Increase the Zero Tax Bracket. >> Senator Rucho is recognized to explain the bill. >> Thank you, Mr. President, members of the Senate. We had a very good discussion the other day in Finance, and talked about the increase in the standard deduction, or what could easily be called the zero bracket. This bill is called the Middle Class Taxpayers Relief Act, and what it does over two years is actually raise from 15,500 to 17,500, the standard deduction. If you look at the numbers it is clearly showing that it will cost about $200 million when fully implemented. But roughly 80 to 82% of all of those dollars goes to people with income under $80,000, which is a huge plus for the middle class. And is timely point where we should be helping those individuals, and help them through some still remaining tough times and a slow economy. To wait four years is like dribbling it out, and especially since the $329 million that came in this year as a increase above what we expected in revenue.

That is the taxpayers money, and should be returned to the taxpayers. And in doing so, we are targeting the middle class in a big way by moving this forward, and also the small businesses that are related to the personal income tax. I urge that we pass this bill, and move forward with support of the middle class. Thank you. >> Senator Tillman, for what purpose do you rise? >> Speak briefly on the bill. >> Senator Tillman, you have the floor to speak to the bill. >> Senator Rucho has led the effort to do tax reform. That is the most significant tax reform in the nation in the last few years, I'd say four years. Leading the nation is not an easy task, and he's led us in this effort. 33 states tried tax reform of the nature we've tried it, of lowering the rates and spreading the base out. Only 1 out of the 33 succeeded, that was North Carolina. But when we give money back to the taxpayers, there's two fields of thought out there. One is, we can't afford to keep cutting taxes. What are gonna do? How are we gonna meet all these needs? There's another way of thinking. It goes, let's reduce government, let's reduce our costs, and let's do what we need to do for schools, and roads and all of that. And remember as Senator Rucho just said, it's not our money. It's their money, and we wanna give it back to them with this zero bracket cut, which is a significant thing. It's for lower income people. If you exclude the first 17,500 of a $35,000, job you've just about taken every bit of their tax liability away from them. And I think it's a good thing folks, and certainly appreciate your support. >> Any further discussion or debate? Senator Tucker, for what purpose do you rise? >> To see if Senator Rucho would answer a question. >> Senator Rucho, do you yield? >> Yes sir. >> Senator Rucho, over this two-year period with this middle class tax cut, what will that mean to a family under $80,000 a year or 50 or whatever their particular income is? >> What that does Senator Tucker, thanks for the question. What that does is it basically removes 75,000 taxpayers off the rolls completely, they don't even have to file. And additionally, the other ones that are there will actually get an additional beyond what they've already got, an additional $115 per family, and married filing jointly. So that's another move in the right direction of helping the middle class. >> Senator McInnis, for what purpose do you rise? >> Speak to the bill. >> Senator McInnis, you have the floor. >> Thank you, Mr. President. Three of my counties are in the 18 that have been designated by the Department of Commerce to be in chronic economic distress. I found information this week that I found very, very disturbing that one was 42%, one was 56%, one was 58% of the families in those three counties were headed by a single parent with children under 18 years old. 58% of the households of one county, headed by heads of household single, with children under 18 years old. This piece of legislation will directly impact those families because it will raise their opportunity to put more money in their pocket. This is a fabulous piece of legislation for rural North Carolina, and I certainly will be supporting it. >> Senator Bryant, for what purpose do you rise? >> To debate the bill. >> Senator Bryant, you have the floor to speak to the bill. >> Members, I just wanna share some reluctance I have about the bill. I will be voting for it, but I feel compelled to, on making this point. That of the $200 million that will be in the tax cut provided here, only 28% of it will go to the poorest families, that's families below $35,000. I'm supporting it because I know we don't have here support for the earned income tax credit, which will provide 80% of this $200 million to families below the $35,000 a year mark. And while I'm happy that there will also be help for the families in the 80,000, $50,000 a year range, it's also the case that in North Carolina, our poorest families are continuing to struggle and be worse off. And we could, with a different policy, make a bigger improvement for that poorest group, and I feel and because my community includes a disproportionate amount of the under 35,000 category, I feel it's important to speak for

them in this regard. Thank you. >> Senator Wells, for what purpose do you rise? >> Debate the bill. >> Senator Wells, you have the floor. >> Thank you Senator Bryant for bringing that up. I'd heard a lot in the House a couple of years back, during a mind numbing debate about the earned income tax credit, when we let it expire. So I asked staff during this conversation, how this bill compared to the earned income tax credit. What does this mean for the poor? I picked four categories of what I would call working poor and middle class incomes, married filing jointly. Incomes of 20,000, 30,000, 40,000, 50,000 a year. Families with no children, families with two children. In 8 of those categories, this bill is better than the earned income tax credit. This bill puts more money in the pockets of those families, than the earned income tax credit. In the one category where it doesn't, it's because of a little glitch in that earned income tax credit that makes it refundable. That is, it's not a credit, it's a welfare check. So we've got one category out of eight where we are not as well as the earned income tax credit. We've got seven categories where we are helping people, and that's what we need to be doing. Looking to help families. This bill does that, I'm supporting it. Thank you. >> Senator McKissick, for what purpose do you rise? >> Speak on the bill. >> Senator Mckissick, you have the floor. >> This bill certainly provides relief to middle income taxpayers, that's undeniable. They will be 75,000 people who currently have to file returns and don't get their refunds back, and then those folks won't have tax liability. So it provides that middle income tax relief that we all want to provide. But I think the observation that Senator Bryant made, as well as many others, about the refundable earned on income tax credit has a great deal of validity. It does not help those that are desperately poor. It does not help those that are truly in need in this State, who we have not been able to help in recent years. So many of the tax cuts that are made have gone to assist those that had high incomes. They've gone to the corporations, which are paying less today. I am glad to see this middle income tax relief provided, but for those that have a little wealth, for those that have few jobs opportunities. For those that are earning minimum wage, for those that are single-income households that are out there with families and kids, among the poorest. And those poor families today, over the last several years have not shared in the economic prosperity that this State has experienced as our economy has rebounded, particularly in the rural segments of our State. We could afford to do both. We could have the refundable earned income tax credit, and we could provide the relief provided by this bill. I wish we had done so. It doesn't stop me from supporting the bill before us, but I hope and I trust that when we see additional revenues coming to this State, that we'll not forget those that haven't been able to join that economic prosperity. We talk a lot about that urban-rural divide. We talk about what we wanna do to address those concerns about wealth disparities in our State. If we'd attached refundable earned income tax credit as part of this bill, it would have done so. >> Senator Alexander, for what purpose do you rise? >> Speak on the bill. >> Senator Alexander, you have the floor. >> I also support this bill, I think it's terrific. I think there's one thing that we haven't quite pointed out, is what the total in the pocket dollars are for the people once this is fully implemented. And the other day in Finance Committee, I think we came up with that number of being $1,006 and 75 cents. So I realize this extra is on top up, that's where it is, but the total amount that people will be saving is in excess of $1,000. >> Any further discussion or debate? Senator Van Duyn, for what purpose you rise? >> To speak on a bill. >> You have the floor Senator Van Duyn. >> Especially in an environment where we are increasing the base for things that we charge sales tax on. I think it's only fair that we recognize the fact that, that puts people at the lower end of the spectrum in a position where they are paying more as a percentage of their income than the rest of us. The earned income tax credit is just your way to balance out that unfairness, and I think it's wrong to characterize it as welfare.

>> Any further discussion or debate? Hearing none, the question before the Senate is the passage of the Committee Substitute to Senate Bill 818 on its second reading. All in favor will vote Aye, opposed will vote No. Five seconds will be allowed for the voting, and the Clerk will record the vote. [BLANK_AUDIO] >> Wade, Senator Wade. Senator Wade, Aye. 48 having voted in the affirmative and 0 in the negative, the Committee Substitutes to Senate Bill 818 passes its second reading, and without objection be read a third time. >> North Carolina General Assembly enacts. >> Any discussion or debate? Hearing none, the question before the Senate is the passage of the Committee Substitute to Senate Bill 818 on its third reading. All in favor say aye, >> Aye. >> Opposed, no. They Ayes have it. The Committee Substitute to Senate Bill 818 passes its third reading, and it will be sent to the House. Senators, we're gonna move on to our joint resolution honoring former Senator Parmon, and in preparation for that joint resolution, the Sergeant-at-Arms will secure the doors. Pages, if we can ask you please to be seated. Members and staff are to remain seated as well during the entire resolution. Senate Joint Resolution 853, the Clerk will read in its entirety. >> Senate Joint Resolution 853, a Joint Resolution honoring the life and memory of Earline W. Parmon, former member of the General Assembly. Whereas, Earline W. Parmon was born on November 18, 1943, in Buffalo, New York, to James and Margaret White Cathcart. And whereas, Earline W. Parmon graduated from Anderson High School in Winston-Salem 1961, and earned a B.S. degree in Business Administration from Winston-Salem State University in 1977. And whereas, Earline W. Parmon served her country as a member of the U.S. Army Reserves, 508 Support Battalion, from 1977 through 1981. And whereas, Earline W. Parmon worked as an education consultant, in 1982, she founded LIFT, Learning Is Fun Too, Learning Center and Academy, to help at-risk students succeed, and served as the Academy's Executive Director until 2001. And whereas, Earline W. Parmon was active in the civic affairs of her community, serving as the first African-American Chair of the Forsyth County Democratic Party, and as a member of the Board of Directors of the Forsyth County Library, and the Board of Trustees of Forsyth Memorial Hospital. And whereas, Earline W. Parmon served as a member of the Forsyth County Board Of Commissioners from 1990 to 2002. And as a member of the Board of Directors of both the National Association of Black County Officials, and the North Carolina Association of County Commissioners. And whereas, Earline W. Parmon served with honor and distinction as a member of the North Carolina General Assembly, serving five terms in the House of Representatives between 2003 and 2012, and one term as a member of the Senate between 2013 and 2014. And whereas, during her tenure in the General Assembly, Earline W. Parmon worked tirelessly for her constituents and the people of this State on many matters, including racial justice, equality, education and justice for eugenics survivors. And whereas, Earline W. Parmon sponsored numerous bills that were enacted, including bills to strengthen domestic violence protection, voter registration, voting at one-stop sites and many others. In 2007, she was the primary sponsor of legislation that established the Silver Alerts System, where a public alert could be issued on a person with dementia, and especially a senior citizen, is reported missing. In 2008, 128 Silver Alerts were issued in North Carolina,

and of that number 118 citizens were safely recovered. And whereas, Earline W. Parmon's devotion to educational issues was embodied in her work and leadership as chair and co-chair of a number of Education Committees and study commissions. Most notably, as co-chair of the Legislative Commission on Dropout Prevention and High School Graduation. Thousands of students across the State of North Carolina benefitted through funding awarded from 2007 through 2009, totaling in excess of $48 million. The 2010 evaluation report to the General Assembly describes the exemplary programs that emerged through this bipartisan effort, and the significant number of youth that were served throughout the State of North Carolina. And whereas, Earline W. Parmon also made significant contribution as a member of other legislative committees including Appropriations, Ethics, Government, and Redistricting. And whereas, Earline W. Parmon served on the National Conference of State Legislators' Education Committee and Task Force on Dropout Prevention. Served as Chaplain for the National Organization of Black Elected Legislative Women, held several leadership roles for the National Black Caucus of State Legislators. And whereas, because of Earline W. Parmon's vision and commitment to excellence and education, the Earline Parmon Scholarship Fund was officially established in 2008. It was her purposeful intent to effect change by helping to create an environment where all students would have access to the necessary resources to further their education. She believed that no students should ever have to worry about how they would pay for books, or housing. And whereas, Earline W. Parmon received an honorary doctorate degree from Winston-Salem State University in 2010, and as well as recognition from many other organizations. Including, the Outstanding Commissioner of the Year from the North Carolina Association of Black Commissioners in 2001. Shirley Chisholm Legacy Award from Union Chapel Baptist Church, Winston-Salem. In 2004, Outstanding Public Policy Award from the Winston-Salem Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc., in 2006. North Carolina Political Trailblazer Award from the North Carolina NAACP in 2009. Trailblazer Award from the Forsyth County Democratic Women in 2012, and the Bertha B. Holt Legislative Courage and Leadership Award from Planned Parenthood of Central North Carolina in 2014. And whereas, Earline W. Parmon was a member of the Phi Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, and a devoted member of Exodus Baptist Church, of which she was a founder and served as an Associate Minister. And whereas, Earline W. Parmon was married to the late Albert Parmon for 47 years. And whereas, Earline W. Parmon died on March 15, 2016, at the age of 72. And whereas, Earline W. Parmon is survived by her children, Elaine King, Grady Parmon, Tracy Ingram, Angela Milton, and Morticia Killian, and nine grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren. Now, therefore, Be it resolved by the Senate, the House of Representatives concurring, Section 1, the General Assembly honors the memory of Earline W. Parmon, and expresses its appreciation for the service she rendered her community, State and nation. Section 2, the General Assembly extends its deepest sympathy to the family of Earline W.Parmon for the loss of a devoted family member. Section 3, the Secretary of State shall transmit a certified copy of this resolution to the family of Earline W. Parmon. Section 4, this resolution is effective upon ratification. >> Senator Lowe is recognized to explain the resolution. >> Thank you, sir. I wanted to first say, as many of you know, Senator Earline

Parmon was a dear friend of mine, and we have been friends for more than 25 years, when she got ready to run for county commissioner as I remember. Because it was few weeks before she got ready to run, I sat down and had dinner with her and Maisie Woodruff and one of our church members, Velma Hopkins. And I remember the meal more than I remember what we talked about because at that meal we had fried chicken, macaroni and cheese, sweetcorn bread and collard greens. Senator Apodaca, you would have loved that meal. >>[LAUGH] >> But at that time, we were supposed to be planning her campaign. And Maisie Woodrow and Velma Hopkins took over that job, and we sat in a corner and talked, and it was during that time that we developed a long, long friendship. And I would say as many of you know, I am grateful for her counsel and her friendship that did not just start when I came here, but has gone on for many, many years. We worked in the trenches of Winston- Salem, working to make, not only Winston-Salem a better place, but North Carolina a better place. So I thank you for this opportunity to offer this resolution, and to remember a great friend, a great lady, and a great leader in North Carolina. Thank you. >> Thank you, Senator Lowe. Is there any further discussion or debate? Senator Davis, for what purpose do you rise? >> To speak on the joint resolution. >> You have the floor, Senator. >> Thanks, Mr. President. To members of the Senate and to Senator Lowe, I wanna thank you for bringing forth this resolution. Senator Parmon, I believe was outstanding North Carolinian and an outstanding American. And I really had an opportunity to get to know her interestingly before she came to the Senate, and some may remember this was interestingly after Vernie Malone had passed. I went over to actually co-chair with Senator Parmon, the Dropout Prevention Commission, and we really spent a lot of time trying to advance efforts in this State around Dropout Prevention. And I believe, as evidence has shown and demonstrated over time, that we did get some really meaningful results. But she was very passionate, very passionate about education in particular, and I believe it was because she understood that education was a ticket out of many situations, and a ticket of success for many kids in North Carolina. Outside of that, when she came over to the Senate, we spent a lot of time together and I think this says we have relationships in this chamber. I think it was because we had a lot in common. We both were very involved in church, she's very, very dedicated to the church. She took pride, absolute pride, and we picked on each other a little bit. She was in the army, I'd been in the air force. And then to her family, I just wanna let you know we shared conversations, and you want to really get her beaming, you started talking about her family. She really enjoyed her family. She loved, and that was very much too part of those dinners you were talking about, as I heard. But as we reflect on Senator Parmon's contributions to the State and to this chamber, I will say to us all that she was an outstanding person, and she'll be known for many things. And as one of the things we'll put on that large list that she was known for now is was her style. She was a very stylish person, and she just had her way. As we as a Senate family honor her today, she was an amazing part of this family. And even though she is not physically with us now, there's no doubt in my mind, that when we get into our most passionate moments here in debate and discussion, then by all means,

that's the spirit of Earline Parmon coming out of us. I miss her dearly, and I commend this resolution to you. >> Mr. President? >> Senator McKissick, for what purpose do you rise? >> Speak on the resolution. >> Senator McKissick, you have the floor. >> Senator Parmon was one of those friends and colleagues who I deeply admired and respected. I came to know her when she was member of the House, before she came over to the Senate. Appreciated her great leadership when it came to a number of bills that we shared interest, interest in introducing. When it comes to mind in particular, I think she was a very strong advocate for was the North Carolina Racial Justice Act. She found it in the House, I found it in the Senate. Eventually it was enacted, and impacted the lives of people who were on death row. People who at this point and time, their sentences are being changed from whether by sentence of death to being in prison for life without the possibility of parole. But I also respected her leadership when it came to concern about eugenics victims, and those eugenics victims that had lost their right, their reproductive rights to have children, many of whom did not know that they were losing their reproductive rights. She introduced legislation on that behalf in the House, I did it in the Senate. We worked together, and working together with Speaker Tillis, when he was here, we indeed ended up with legislation that was enacted by this General Assembly, which has assisted many of those eugenics victims, many of those people who lost their reproductive rights. Those two issues I think of particularly, when I think of Senator Parmon. Because of her ferocious advocacy, because of her tenacity, because of her relentlessness to not give up when there were formidable challenges ahead of us on each of those matters. This chamber and this State will be better served by the fact that she has been here among us. And wherever she maybe today, I can guarantee you that she continues with her shield in her hand and a sword, standing up and fighting vigorously for the principles that she believes in. >> Senator Bryant, for what purpose do you rise? >> To speak on the resolution, Mr. President. >> Senator Bryant, you have the floor. >> I wanted to just stand up and make some remarks in memory of Representative and Senator Parmon. I got to serve with her in both the House and the Senate. Senator McKissick has already referenced some of her work, but I just thought about how she took on some of the hardest and most difficult issues. When she started working on the eugenics, I have to admit my eyes started glazing over when she would talk to me about it. I thought, Earline, you will never do anything for these eugenics victims. As much as I sympathized with and understood the harm that was done with them, I had no sense that she would ultimately accomplish what she did in a bipartisan fashion, as Senator McKissick mentioned. And I can almost say the same thing when she started out with the Racial Justice Act, in that it seemed like such a monumental hurdle to crawl, to jump over. I believed and understood the racial prejudice that has long been documented in the death penalty, and understood that challenge. And yet knew how hard it was gonna be and long it was gonna take to get to where she and Representative Womble, Senator McKissick and indeed all of us who supported that effort got. And I've never seen her happier as the day when that Racial Justice Act was passed, and then when relief started being available to prisoners on death row because of that, who had been discriminated against unfairly because of race in the implementation of the death penalty. So, she will long be a champion for that, and taking up some of the hardest issues. And finally on Dropout Prevention, I really learned so much from her about that, and I think we really made a shift. And this was her leadership, in the change in focus on high school graduation by the Dropout Prevention Program that was implemented under her leadership. And part of the brilliance of that program, was that we shifted the responsibility for increasing high school graduation and reducing drop outs, not to just the schools and the teachers, and the State Board or a DPI. But we shifted that responsibility to the communities, for them to learn about and understand what the best practices were on their parts to increase the graduation

rates. And that was her leadership, and that was the beginning of a shift in high school graduation in North Carolina, and again a credit to her brilliance, her vision and her great leadership. I loved her dearly. She also was a great Pinnacle player. And because of that, I used to have to carry around my sheet with the rules and the numbers, just so that I could pull them out and play with her when she would demand for me to play cuz she was so good, and I could never remember all of that. But she was a wonderful person, and I loved her dearly, and she was a great public servant. Thank you. >> Thank you Senator. Senator Robinson, for what purpose do you rise? >> To speak on the resolution. >> Senator Robinson, you have the floor. >> Just briefly ladies and gentlemen, I certainly want to be able to stand and say about Earline Parmon. Earline Parmon was my friend, and we all loved Earline. I knew her before I came here, before she went into the General Assembly. And when she went into the House, she remained a friend of mine and others in the community. And I would say next to her family, she loved her community most. Everybody in Winston-Salem knew if they needed an advocate, Earline Parmon and then Larry Womble. Those two people were the folks you could count on, all the way from education to health. Both of us run nonprofits, and we often talked about the ills in communities that kept people from thriving, and surviving and then getting a lift up to keep on making it. And education was just one of those primary things, and Earline loved that dearly and would do whatever she could. She supported those causes because she loved people, and she supported people and their opportunity to be the very best they could be, and that's what I think about. And just one quick, funny story I remember. When I came to the Senate, and Earline and Alman, all those in the House and they said, well okay Senator Robinson, you're over there in the House and they don't let you say anything over there, and so if you wanna talk you need to come over to the House. So I remember when Earline came to the Senate and I said to her, Earline, you've been sitting over there mighty quiet. This is the Senate, but I haven't heard you talk as much as you talked in the House. And so we had a little joke going back and forth because I finally said to her, well in the House, it's just that everybody hasn't said everything, and in the Senate, we know we say it once or twice and then we wanna go on and vote on it. But we laughed about that in terms of what went on in both the House and the Senate, and really enjoyed the camaraderie of trying to really make North Carolina work for everybody. So we all loved Earline. I loved Earline. To her community, her family, we wanna thank you for sharing her with us and with the community, and I certainly commend the resolution to you, and thanks Senator Lowe for bringing it forward. >> Senator Foushee, for what purpose do you rise? >> To speak briefly on the resolution. >> You have the floor, Senator. >> Thank you, Mr. President. Members and visitors in the gallery, I am grateful for the privilege to speak in honor of Senator Earline Parmon. Some of you may know that before coming to the General Assembly, I served as the county commissioner, as did Senator Parmon. And it was as a county commissioner that I was first introduced to her. Immediately, I was impressed with the vim and vigor, and the vitality with which she did and approached her work. It was not enough for her just to be present, but she had to participate. She had a style and a grace that was distinct. And it was that style, that led her peers at the North Carolina Association for County Commissioners to appoint her to the Board of Directors for three terms, and as Chair of the Criminal Justice Steering Committee for a term. She also served as chair of the County Caucus here at the General Assembly in the last biennium. It was a style and a grace, that as they say was often imitated, but never duplicated. For her it was never about Commissioner Parmon, or Representative Parmon, or Senator Parmon. It wasn't even about Earline. For her it was always, always, always about the people. For that and many other reasons, I am proud to honor her today, and I do indeed commend the resolution to you.

[BLANK_AUDIO] >> Senator Apodaca, for what purpose you rise? >> Speak on the resolution. >> Senator Apodaca you have the floor. >> Thank you, Mr. President, members. I'd be remiss if I didn't make some comments about Earline, we probably spent more time together than anybody else in this room with her. We both possessed a love of tobacco products back in the good old days, and before heart surgery and other things, but Earline was always, always great company and great conversation. And I'll be honest with you, we settled about every problem in North Carolina over a pack of Marlboro Lights, and I can't remember what she smoked, but we did enjoy it. We went through the loss of her husband, whom she loved very and we always discussed family. Family was always at the top of the list, and enjoyed sharing stories on both, and then we would delve into issues and it was just a great experience. And when she came to the Senate, I told her, her chances of going to heaven were much better because she was closer to heaven in the Senate, and - >> [LAUGH] >> I miss her dearly, especially when I look at her replacement everyday. So - >> [LAUGH] >> But seriously, she was an incredible lady, and an advocate for those who needed advocation, and she is missed. Thank you, Mr. President. I recommend the resolution too. >> Senator Van Duyn, for what purpose you rise? >> To speak on the resolution. >> You have the floor, Senator. >> Unfortunately, my first session was Senator Parmon's last, and one of my biggest regrets is that I didn't take advantage of that year to get to know her better. But Senator Parmon was quoted as saying, let the work I've done speak for me, and I think what we've heard today is she did an awful lot of very important work. Senator Parmon believed in making waves. And with each small methodical step, she initiated a flood of lasting progress on her community and throughout the State. Senator Parmon understood the inner connectivity of the challenges that we face, and more importantly she understood the personal adversity that faced each and every one of her constituents. As they battled rising healthcare costs, increasingly underfunded education system, and an economic system that all too frequently left them behind. I commend Senator Lowe, for bringing forth this acknowledgement of Senator Parmon's life, and her lasting legacy on North Carolina. And as the Senate Democratic whip, I call on each of you to offer your support for this resolution. >> Senator Newton, for what purpose do you rise?>> To speak to the resolution. >> You have the floor, Senator Newton. >> Thank you, Mr. President. Members, I'm sure some of you are a little surprised that I might be rising to speak to this resolution because I didn't know, I didn't know Senator Parmon as well as some of you do, or did. But I feel compelled to speak because Senator Davis, you said something in your remarks that reminded me again of a situation, and I call it a situation because I think that's probably the best, the best description of it. Senator Parmon, I believe was a great Christian lady. She was a great Christian lady, and I tell this story about her because it doesn't reflect well upon me, it reflects very well upon her. We had a particularly difficult debate in the chamber one day. I believe we were discussing and debating an abortion bill, and it got particularly heated in here. It wasn't anything that Senator Parmon and I said to each other, but I was sitting over there, and Senator Parmon sat behind Senator Daniel. You may remember this cuz I think you might have been standing there. But as soon as debate was over and we were done with session, Senator Parmon said something to me about the bill, and I know now and very clearly, that what she said wasn't that bad. It was probably a little bit not quite the tone that she was looking for, and in a light that was very unflattering to me. I responded in a way that I should not have responded, and what I said wasn't that bad, it was the way I said it that was bad. So we had this little tiff, and the next day I was in the cafeteria downstairs and I saw Senator

Parmon come in. And she turned and she looked at me, and I looked at her and we made eye contact, and she made a beeline to me before I could take a step forward, and she made it very clear how sorry she was, that as a Christian she should not have presented that way. And I was so embarrassed, I was so embarrassed because I should have been the one who was there doing that, and we had a good moment. And we both recognized that as we get passionate about issues here, which she was, her belief and her faith would not allow her to continue to carry on and have that kind of relationship with me, about something that we both felt so passionately about, even though we disagreed. And so I felt compelled to offer you that story today because I just thought the world of her after that, and I'm sorry I didn't get to know her better. So I commend the resolution to you. >> Any further discussion or debate? Senator Daniel, for what purpose do you rise? >> Speak to the resolution. >> Senator Daniel, you have the floor.>> Thank you, Mr. President, members of the Senate. Like some of you who had not served in the House, I also did not get the chance to know Senator Parmon as good as I would have liked. I think she served here for around two years, and you'd think that, that was a long time and anybody to get to know someone. But the truth is we're all so busy dealing with our constituent issues, and the things that we're trying to get accomplished in the legislature that sometimes we overlook our personal relationships more than we should. But the reason that I wanted to speak today, and I felt that I should, similar to Senator Newton that I should, is that my two daughters are here Paging today. And so for them and for the other young Pages that are here, I wanted to maybe try to help you learn a little bit of lesson about government, about service. And I think if you, I know you didn't have a copy of the resolution in front of you, but as we were going through it and Mr. Settles was reading it, I noticed that Senator Parmon had served I think 12 years in the county commission, she had served approximately 12 years in the legislatures. That she spent, she dedicated quarter of a century of her life to public service, and probably none of us know the amount of sacrifice that, that took. Now we have Memorial Day that's coming up in a few days, and that's a day that we take to remember the sacrifices of people that we didn't know, who made great contributions to our country in securing our freedom. And so for the young people in the audience, the Senate is not an eternal body, but its an enduring body, and it's made up of people who each contribute to it in their own way over the course of time. And I know over the time that I've been here, we've lost a number of our members who have contributed a great deal to this institution. And it's on days like this, when we have the opportunity to pause for a moment, and to remember the contribution that people with temporary lives contribute to an enduring body and by doing that, they contribute to the goodness of this State and to the service of our people. And so that's the lesson that I want my daughters to learn, and the young people here to learn today is that, try to seek the opportunity to serve your fellow community members, your fellow citizens. Seek those opportunities throughout your life, and to emulate the example that people like Senator Parmon have done in their lives. >> Any further discussion or debate? Hearing none, the question before the Senate is the passage of Senate Joint Resolution 853 on its second reading. All in favor will vote Aye, opposed will vote No. Five seconds to be allowed for the voting, and the Clerk will record the vote. [BLANK_AUDIO] 48 having voted in the affirmative and 0 in the negative, Senate Joint Resolution 853 passes its second reading. Without objection will be read a third time. >> The General Assembly of North Carolina enacts. >> Any discussion or debate? Hearing none, the question before the Senate is the passage of Senate Joint Resolution 853 on its third reading. All in favor will say Aye, >> Aye. >> Opposed, No. The Ayes have it. Senate Joint Resolution 853 passes its third reading, and it will be sent

to the House by special message. And at this time, the Chair is happy to extend courtesies of the gallery to the family of Senator Parmon, who is with us here today. Tracy Ingram, daughter. Angela Milton, daughter, and Kayla Milton, granddaughter. And any other extended family and friends that are with us, please stand and be recognized. Thanks for joining us in the Senate today. >> [APPLAUSE] >> Mr. President? >> Senator Brock, for what purpose do you rise? >> To make a motion. >> You have the floor, Senator. >> I move, that the words spoken on Senate Joint Resolution 853, to honor Senator Earline Parmon be spread upon the Journal. >> Without objection, so ordered. At this time we'll return to our calendar, we have one item left on our calendar for the day. House Bill 357, the Clerk will read. >> House Bill 357, Chemical Analysis Report/District Court. >> Senator Jackson is recognized to explain the bill. >> Thank you, Mr. President. This bill is almost technical, I'd call it one step above technical. There was a Supreme Court case about 20 years ago, that changed the requirements for calling witness for criminal prosecutions. So that if there had been a test of someone's blood, or say a test of white powder, to determine the alcohol content in the blood, or what that white powder actually was, according to this Supreme Court ruling, now the prosecution had to bring in the lab analyst who conducted the test. The result of this ruling was an almost immediate enormous backlog here at our State Crime Lab, it's something we've been working through. One of the ways that we're coping with that Supreme Court ruling, a few years ago, we passed a law that said that the State can give notice to the defense that they do not intend to call the analyst. And if the defense does not object, that relieves the State of the requirement of having to call the analyst, and that law is on the books and it's been working fine. This is a small amendment to the notice requirement that the State has, as far as providing notice to defense counsel. It was the product of a stakeholder process led by Representative Stam, in which lots of folks participated. There is no objection, no opposition that I'm aware of. That's the nature of the bill, and before we get to it, we do have a small amendment that is purely technical in nature that I would offer to you now. >> The Clerk will read. >> Senator Jackson moves to amend the bill. >> Senator Jackson is recognized to explain the amendment. >> Section 1, simply specifies the citation that is being used, and Section 2, clarifies a typographical matter for the effective date. >> Do we have any discussion or debate? Hearing none, the question before the Senate is the adoption of Amendment 1. All in favor will vote Aye, opposed will vote No. Five seconds will be allowed for the voting, and the Clerk will record the vote. [BLANK_AUDIO] 48 having voted in the affirmative and 0 in the negative, Amendment 1 is adopted. Senator Jackson is recognized. >> Commend the bill to you, happy to answer any questions. >> Any discussion or debate on the bill as amended? Hearing none, the question before the Senate is the passage of the Senate Committee Substitute to House Bill 357, as amended on its second reading. All in favor will vote aye, opposed will vote no. Five seconds to be allowed for the voting, and the Clerk will record the vote. [BLANK_AUDIO] 48 having voted in the affirmative and 0 in the negative, the Senate Committee Substitute to House Bill 357 as amended passes its second reading. Without objection, it will be read a third time. >> The North Carolina General Assembly enacts. >> Any discussion or debate? Hearing none, the question before the Senate is the passage of Senate Committee Substitute to House Bill 357 as amended on its third reading. All in favor will say aye, >> Aye. >> Opposed, no. The Ayes have it. Senate Committee Substitute to House Bill 357 as amended passes its third reading. The amendment will be attached, and it will be sent to the House for concurrent engross. The amendment will be engrossed, I'm sorry. It will be sent to the House for concurrence in the Senate Committee Substitute. Senator Rabon, for what purpose do you rise?

>> Send forth a committee report, out of order. >>Senator Rabon, you can send forward your committee report out of order. [BLANK_AUDIO] >> Senator Rabon and the Finance Committee submits for passage Senate Bill 774. Unfavorable as to bill, but favorable as to Committee Substitute bill. Title, an act removing certain described property from the corporate limits of the village of Marvin and the City of Asheboro. [BLANK_AUDIO] >> Senate Bill 774, calendar. That wraps up our calendar for the day, do we have any notices or announcements? Senator Brown, for what purpose do you rise? >> An announcement. >> You have the floor. >> Republicans will caucus immediately after session. >> Any other notices or announcements? Senator Van Duyn, for what purpose do you rise? >> Democrats have caucus after session. >> Anyone else? Notices or announcements? Any further business to come before the Senate? If not, the Chair recognizes Senator Berger for a motion. >> Thank you, Mr. President. I move, that the Senate do now adjourn subject to stipulations Stated in Senate Rule 24.1, the appointment of conferees, the receipt of committee reports, the ratification of bills, and receipt of House messages. To reconvene on Wednesday, May 25, 2016, at 9:30 AM. >> The motion is the Senate do now adjourn, subject to the stipulations stated by Senator Berger, to reconvene Wednesday May 25th at 9:30 AM, seconded by Senator Lowe. All in favor say, Aye, >> Aye. >> Opposed, No. The Ayes have it. The Senate stands adjourned.